Connect with us

Government

West Nile Virus Detected in Rockland County Mosquitoes

Published

on

NEW CITY, NY – Rockland County Health officials announce the first two pools, or groups, of mosquitoes to test positive for West Nile Virus (WNV) this year in Rockland County has been confirmed by the New York State Department of Health.

The infected mosquitoes were collected from traps in the Town of Orangetown and Town of Clarkstown during the week of June 21st as part of the County’s ongoing mosquito surveillance efforts. No human cases have been reported this season. The last human case reported in Rockland was in 2018. “This is typically the time of the year we expect to see a rise in West Nile Virus activity, and these positive mosquito pools confirm that,” said Dr. Ruppert.

Most mosquitoes do not test positive for disease-causing viruses. However, a bite from a West Nile Virus-infected mosquito can cause serious illness, and in some cases, death. Although a person’s chances of getting sick are small, those aged 50 and older are at the highest risk for serious illness. Not everyone infected with West Nile Virus will become ill. However, West Nile can cause serious complications, including neurological diseases, and can also cause a milder flu-like illness, including fever, headache and body aches, nausea, and occasionally a skin rash and swollen lymph glands. If you think you have symptoms of West Nile Virus, see your doctor right away.

Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water. The eggs hatch into larvae that develop in the water for 7 to 10 days before emerging as adult mosquitoes that fly and bite. Many types of mosquitoes, including those that can spread disease, lay their eggs in items around the home, such as in birdbaths, unused flowerpots, discarded tires, and even bottle caps, as well as in small ponds or other bodies of stagnant water. “Health Department mosquito control teams will continue to visit all known mosquito breeding sites, including sites near these positive mosquito pools. Larval control activities will continue throughout the summer,” said Dr. Ruppert.

The best and most effective mosquito control begins in your yard. Eliminating standing water is the first step in reducing mosquito breeding.

Photo credit – CDC

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Entertainment

Clarkstown Resident Rescue of a Baby Deer Goes Viral, Recognized by Supervisor Hoehmann

Published

on

NEW CITY, NY – Clarkstown’s Danielle Cifuni Rescue of a Baby Deer Goes Viral, Recognized Today by Clarkstown Supervisor George Hoehmann.

Lauren Marie Wohl, the admin of the popular Town of Clarkstown community group – Clarkstown Community Uncensored posted the story of a New City mom who jumped right into action saving a baby deer who was drowning in her pool. Wohl’s post has gone viral with over 1,000 likes on Facebook and the story being featured on almost every major NYC news station.

Today, Town of Clarkstown Supervisor George Hoehmann thanked Danielle and presented her with a certification of merit on behalf of the town.

You can read the full story below-

The baby deer broke the fence around the pool by slamming into it several times (very determined little baby deer)! The deer then fell into the pool. Danielle saw the deer drowning so she jumped into action to remove it from the pool. The deer was okay but crying after Danielle removed it from the pool. The mommy deer heard her baby and came out from the woods to watch. The baby deer is fine and went off with her mommy back into the woods! Danielle has a few hoof bruises but she said she is just happy the deer is okay and back safely with it’s mom!

Great job Danielle! 🦌

Continue Reading

Government

COVID-19 Delta Variant Confirmed in Rockland: Rockland DOH

Published

on

NEW CITY, NY – Rockland County officials announce that at least four cases of the highly contagious Delta (B.1.617.2) variant were confirmed to be in our community during the second week of July. Cases and the positivity rate in Rockland have increased over the last several weeks, likely due to the Delta variant.

County Executive Ed Day and County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert are urging unvaccinated residents to get vaccinated for COVID-19 as soon as possible.

COVID-19 continues to spread in the United States and constantly changes through mutation, with new virus variants expected to occur. Multiple variants of the virus that causes COVID-19 have been documented in the United States and globally during this pandemic.

Classified by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a variant of concern, the Delta variant, initially detected in India and first detected in the United States in March 2021, is now the dominant form of COVID-19 cases in the U.S. This variant seems to spread more easily and quickly than other strains, leading to more cases of COVID-19. The Delta variant also impacts younger age groups more than previous strains, as more young people are getting sick and hospitalized with COVID-19. An increase in the number of cases will lead to more hospitalizations and potentially more deaths.

“All COVID-19 vaccines authorized for emergency use in the United States have proven extremely safe and effective at preventing serious illness, hospitalization, and death from COVID-19, including against variants of concern such as Delta. The antibody responses generated from the vaccine are much stronger and more consistent than immunity after a natural COVID-19 infection, making it even more important to get a vaccine, even if you’ve already had COVID-19,” said County Health Commissioner Dr. Patricia Schnabel Ruppert.

Nearly all recent COVID deaths have been in unvaccinated individuals. The CDC is now calling the COVID-19 pandemic a “pandemic of the unvaccinated.” Those who are unvaccinated and not practicing public health measures such as wearing a mask indoors, staying at least 6 feet apart, and avoiding crowds, have the greatest risk of becoming seriously ill or dying, which is why the Rockland County Department of Health (RCDOH) urges all eligible individuals to get vaccinated as soon as they are able.

“With recent COVID deaths and hospitalizations nationwide made up almost entirely of those who are unvaccinated, I strongly urge those who have not yet gotten the shot to reconsider and do so now. These numbers are compelling, and we must act to protect ourselves, our family and our entire community from further harm,” said County Executive Ed Day.

If you’re already vaccinated, please talk to your unvaccinated friends or family about the dangers of the Delta variant and the importance of getting vaccinated before it’s too late. Anyone with questions or concerns about the vaccines should talk to their doctor.

Continue Reading
Advertisement

Facebook

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Trending